Trust and Wait

Christians are often troubled when they see God help others, but not them. Why some are miraculously healed and others are not is difficult to understand.

Luke records a time when John the Baptist sent two disciples to ask, “Are you the one who is to come or shall we expect another.” They had heard what Jesus was doing, but what he wasn’t doing concerned them and they were struggling. Jesus answered gently and with great respect for John, referring to what the prophet Isaiah had foretold and saying in effect, “trust me.”

Chosen for the Praise of His Glory

Pastor Hinkle begins a new series of sermons drawn from the book of Ephesians. In this sermon on Ephesians 1, he talks about why the letter, which was written while Paul was in prison, overflows with praise to God.

Christmas Eve 2017

It’s more than 2000 years since Christ was born, but the Church still sings the song of the angels, “Glory to God in the highest and peace to his people on earth.” We sing it despite our troubles. We sing it because the angel’s message is still good news to troubled people and we sing it with an important difference, an addition that they could not rightfully sing.

Come Down, O Lord!

Isaiah, the prophet, cried out to God, “O that you would rend the heavens and come down!”  But if God comes in his glory, Isaiah wonders, can we be saved? For in his words, “we have been long in our sins.”

This short sermon explains how God came and still comes to his people to save them.

The Humility and Compassion of Christ

Audio Sermon on Luke:14:1-14

This portion of the Gospel of Luke is often said to be about humility, and it is; however, it would be more complete to say it is about both humility and compassion. You see, when humble people encounter someone in need they are moved to act. Jesus was such a person and in this sermon, I’ll share with you how the humble compassion of Christ moved him to act on your behalf and why you can thank, but never repay him for what he has done for you.

The Lord Is My Shepherd

In Psalm 23, David expressed his confidence in God and the care God provided him. A thousand years later, when Jesus said, “I am the good shepherd” he was identifying himself as the one who gave David rest and who would provide life and rest for us.